What Percentage Of Hands Should You Play In Poker

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While you should not make a habit of this, it is a good play to have in your arsenal when taking on someone playing a solid loose-aggressive poker strategy. Furthermore, you can extend this. Texas Hold'em is always a game you should play with the long term in mind, if your poker hand has a 55/45 advantage compared to your opponents, you can lose it 10 times in a row. But if you play the hand 10,000 times on average you will win 55% (5.500) times.This is.

  • Texas Hold'em is always a game you should play with the long term in mind, if your poker hand has a 55/45 advantage compared to your opponents, you can lose it 10 times in a row. But if you play the hand 10,000 times on average you will win 55% (5.500) times.This is why good bankroll management is important. A quick test of your poker skills.
  • You should aim for a flop percentage of about 10-15% in the early-mid stages, and 15 – 20% in the middle to late stages. Calling the flop in tournaments should take into account a few important factors: your position, characteristics of your table, and your hands. Position in my opinion is.
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What’s Your MTT Flop Percentage?

The biggest mistake weak players in MTTs make is calling to see the flop too often or not pre-flop raising enough. The question is what is a good flop percentage in tournaments? It’s true in cash games you should be averaging to see a flop percentage of about 30% (percentage of times you call to see the flop for each hand dealt), however tournaments are not cash games.

In tournaments and MTT strategy this figure needs to be much lower. You should aim for a flop percentage of about 10-15% in the early-mid stages, and 15 – 20% in the middle to late stages. Calling the flop in tournaments should take into account a few important factors: your position, characteristics of your table, and your hands.

Position in my opinion is the most important factor. From late position you’ll often receive better odds for calling the flop because you’ll have the most information on your table at each round. You should also be blind stealing and limping more from the CO so you’re bound to see more flops. In Early position and the blinds, MTT players make the worst decisions and call the flop too often. To defend your blinds properly, you need to raise or fold an open-raiser from SB and BB. Flat-calling normally gives you negative EV because you have to act first on all future streets.

If you’ve not started using professonional MTT tools such as tournament indicator then you should do so now. These tools let you view everyones VPIP% (how often they see the flop), which in turn allows you to adjust to each player’s playing style. During the early stages of a tournament a typical TAG will have a VPIP% below 10%. This is ok considering we want to play tight in the early stages, but once the middle stages begin you should be seeing a VPIP% up to 20%. Anything less than this means you have room to improve.

Why Do Bad MTT Players Have a Higher Flop Percentage in Tournaments?

There are two logical reasons in my opinion why bad players have a higher flop percentage in tournaments.

  • The first reason is that they want to hit a monster. New players don’t like to risk their entire tournament stack on just a few hands, so they try to counter this risk by getting involved in as many pots as possible. The rational of a bad player is that the more flops he/she sees, the higher the chance of hitting a very strong hand and trapping a large number of players. While it’s true this will yield a big payoff, the number of hands required to do this will make your stack so small that by the time you make a hand you’re winnings won’t be as big as you thought. This type of play requires a much bigger stack than that given at the start of MTTs to deal with the variance.
  • The second reason for this high flop percentage in bad players is because their starting hand range is bad. Particularly in the early stages of tournaments you should only consider calling to see the flop with premium hands most the time. This includes AK, AQ, AJ (late position), pocket pairs and suited connectors from late position. The fact bad players don’t fold hands outside this range leads to a higher flop percentage – which bleeds chips.

Your Flop Percantage Should Change as You Progress in the Tournament

As you progress through the tournament to the middle and later stages your flop percentage should increase. This is because in the middle and later stages of the tournament you should be opening up your starting hand range to include things like pocket pairs and raising in middle position with suited connectors or A10 from late position on a dry board. From the middle stages we should have a VPIP% above 15% and once we make it to the final table and the game becomes short-handed we should see our flop percentage rise to even 20% or more.


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Steve Selbrede

Buffalo blitz slot rtp. My previous article, 'Low Stakes Live Games Differ From Online,' pointed out that live, low-stakes no-limit hold'em games — what I call 'Donkey Games' — play much differently than much tougher online games.

One key statistic showing that difference is VPIP percentage, which refers to how often players Voluntarily Put money In the Pot. This is simply a measure of how loose a player is.

What Percentage Of Hands Should I Win In Poker

We see from Figure 1 (Row 1) that the average Vegas $1/$2 player has a VPIP of 37 percent, which is nearly 70 percent looser than the average online NL100 player who has a VPIP of just 22 percent. Clearly online poker games play a lot tighter. But just how many hands should we be playing?

Online VPIP

In my first book, The Statistics of Poker, I analyzed about 6 million hand histories for online NL50 and NL100. Figure 2 below is a plot of the average online Win Rate for online players with various VPIP percentages.

This shows that the 'peak' player wins about 1 BB per hundred hands by playing about 15 percent of his hands. Notice that the 'average' online player loses about 5 BB/100 by playing 22 percent of his hands (the square symbol). What this plot tells us is that the average 15 percent VPIP player is a modest winner, but the average 22 percent VPIP player is a big loser. Notice also that playing 'too tight' is not nearly as damaging to our Win Rate as playing 'too loose.'

However, this curve does not necessarily say that 15 percent VPIP is 'optimum.' The average 15 percent player is actually mixture of strong and weak players, so the strongest 15 percent VPIP players will win more than 1 BB/100. In fact, it seems plausible that the best players can get away with playing a few more hands than 15 percent. I have analyzed the raw data in many different ways and have concluded that the optimum online VPIP is 15-16 percent.

Live VPIP

Producing a curve like Figure 2 for live play is practically impossible. However, we can get fairly reliable average VPIP values for live games by recording just a few hundred live hand histories. I have done this for four Vegas card rooms, finding that the average Vegas VPIP is about 37 percent.

Though some tables are tighter than others, VPIP changes very little between the Strip and off-Strip rooms. It may be slightly tighter during the morning and somewhat looser on weekends, but the variation is not generally dramatic. Even Vegas $2/$5 games are similarly loose.

So Vegas low-stakes NLH games are much looser than online games. How should we expect this to affect the optimal VPIP of a Vegas game?

The extra looseness of Vegas low-stakes NLH is not the only factor to consider. Since there are more players per pot in the Vegas game, and since Vegas players are much worse than online players, the average pot size is larger (see Figure 1, Row 7). That implies we should be able to play more hands in the Vegas game, especially when we have position.

But we shouldn't go crazy here. We can't maximize our Vegas profit by playing as many hands as our opponents do. But if we are skillful postflop, and if we add our 'extra' hands in late position, we should be able to increase our 'optimal' VPIP to around 20 percent.

What Percentage Of Hands Should You Play In Poker Calculator

We will never know (based on data) what this optimum really is, but 20 percent is a reasonable initial target for an average Donkey Game. If the game is tighter than normal, with fewer players limping and with smaller pots, playing a bit tighter is usually a good adjustment. For extremely loose and passive games, we can usually play a bit looser.

The final factor in how loose to play is the quality of your own postflop play. If you are only a slight winning player at 20 percent VPIP, you should consider playing a bit tighter. Once you fix your major postflop leaks, you can consider adding additional marginal hands, especially in late position.

Position

The previous discussion only considered average VPIP, ignoring the critical importance of position (this will be the topic of my next article). Nevertheless, if you play live low-stakes no-limit hold'em, you are probably too loose.

You can estimate your live VPIP in a fairly straight-forward way — just count your VPIP hands for a few sessions. If your card room deals about 35 hands per hour, you can get a reasonable convergence in just 5 or 10 hours.

If you are somewhere near 20 percent, you are in the right ballpark. But if you are playing 30 percent, 40 percent, or even more of your hands, you should begin thinking about how to fix this leak.

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Steve Selbrede has been playing poker for 20 years and writing about it since 2012. He is the author of five books, The Statistics of Poker, Beat the Donks, Donkey Poker Volume 1: Preflop, Donkey Poker Volume 2: Postflop, and Donkey Poker Volume 3: Hand Reading.

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What Percentage Of Hands Should You Play In Poker 2020

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